victoriansilurianlesbianthespian
isaia:

hellorenee:

"While women in precolonial Philippines were often designated to the venerable position of the babaylan, it was not an uncommon occurrence for them to pick up arms and become warriors.”
- Perry Gil S. Mallari, The Filipina as Ritualistic and Warrior

Photograph source??? This is beautiful!

isaia:

hellorenee:

"While women in precolonial Philippines were often designated to the venerable position of the babaylan, it was not an uncommon occurrence for them to pick up arms and become warriors.”

- Perry Gil S. Mallari, The Filipina as Ritualistic and Warrior

Photograph source??? This is beautiful!

Christian ‘Kit’ Cavanagh was an Irishwoman who fought in the British army as a dragoon during the 17th and early 18th centuries.
Born in 1667 in Dublin, ‘Kit’ was a wild teenager who eventually settled down to run a pub with her husband Richard Welsh. When Welsh disappeared in 1691, Cavanagh received a letter indicating he had, possibly not by choice, ended up in the British Army and been sent to Holland. Unwilling to lose her husband she left her children with her mother, disguised herself as a man and joined the British Army on a mission to find him.
As an infantryman she fought at the Battle of Landen, where she was wounded and captured by the French. She was eventually returned to the British, but was discharged from the army for killing a sergeant in a duel over a woman. She immediately re-enlisted and joined the Royal Scots Greys Dragoons, with whom she served until the end of the Nine Years’ War. During this time she grew to enjoy the life of a soldier, with a penchant for the looting that followed battle. 
Cavanagh re-enlisted with the Scots Greys when the War of the Spanish Succession began in 1701. She was shot in the thigh during the Battle of Schellenberg, but refused to be sidelined and fought in the Battle of Blenheim a month later. After this battle she was assigned to guard French prisoners, where after 13 years of searching she found her husband. Unfortunately when she found Richard he was courting a Dutch woman. Having rebuked him fiercely she left and returned to her life with the Scots Greys.
Cavanagh’s identity as a man had never been challenged, despite being known as the ‘Pretty Dragoon’. However when her skull was fractured at the Battle of Ramillies the surgeon treating her discovered she was a woman. She was discharged but carried on with the army as a sutleress, and some accounts claim she continued to fight on the front lines.
On return to Britain Cavanagh was presented to Queen Anne, who granted her a bounty of £50 and a pension for her services. Following her death in 1739 she was buried with full military honours. 

Christian ‘Kit’ Cavanagh was an Irishwoman who fought in the British army as a dragoon during the 17th and early 18th centuries.

Born in 1667 in Dublin, ‘Kit’ was a wild teenager who eventually settled down to run a pub with her husband Richard Welsh. When Welsh disappeared in 1691, Cavanagh received a letter indicating he had, possibly not by choice, ended up in the British Army and been sent to Holland. Unwilling to lose her husband she left her children with her mother, disguised herself as a man and joined the British Army on a mission to find him.

As an infantryman she fought at the Battle of Landen, where she was wounded and captured by the French. She was eventually returned to the British, but was discharged from the army for killing a sergeant in a duel over a woman. She immediately re-enlisted and joined the Royal Scots Greys Dragoons, with whom she served until the end of the Nine Years’ War. During this time she grew to enjoy the life of a soldier, with a penchant for the looting that followed battle. 

Cavanagh re-enlisted with the Scots Greys when the War of the Spanish Succession began in 1701. She was shot in the thigh during the Battle of Schellenberg, but refused to be sidelined and fought in the Battle of Blenheim a month later. After this battle she was assigned to guard French prisoners, where after 13 years of searching she found her husband. Unfortunately when she found Richard he was courting a Dutch woman. Having rebuked him fiercely she left and returned to her life with the Scots Greys.

Cavanagh’s identity as a man had never been challenged, despite being known as the ‘Pretty Dragoon’. However when her skull was fractured at the Battle of Ramillies the surgeon treating her discovered she was a woman. She was discharged but carried on with the army as a sutleress, and some accounts claim she continued to fight on the front lines.

On return to Britain Cavanagh was presented to Queen Anne, who granted her a bounty of £50 and a pension for her services. Following her death in 1739 she was buried with full military honours. 

Æthelflæd was an Anglo-Saxon queen and warrior in 9th and 10th century England, who fought to protect her land from Viking invasion.
The eldest child of King Alfred of Wessex (better known as Alfred the Great), Æthelflæd was raised in a time when the kingdoms of England were being conquered by Danish Vikings to create the new territory of the Danelaw. As a teenager she was married to Æthelred, lord of the neighbouring kingdom of Mercia, to form an alliance against the Vikings. On the way to her wedding she personally fought off a Viking attack, which may have been sent to assassinate her and prevent the marriage.
The alliance proved effective in bullying the Vikings into making a temporary peace, and the couple took advantage by building a series of forts to help defend their lands. When in 902 Æthelred began to suffer a wasting illness, Æthelflæd became the ruler of Mercia in all but name.
As ‘Lady of the Mercians’ she undertook a military and political campaign to reclaim what had been lost to the Danelaw. In 905 she led her forces in repelling a Viking attack on the port of Chester, and in 907 she took an army deep into Danish East Anglia to retrieve the bones of a Christian saint.
In 917 she again went to war, not just against Vikings at Derby, but also against Welsh kings who had been opening their borders to Viking forces. This was more of a tactical than bloodthirsty move, leading to alliances with some Welsh rulers. A cunning politician, she also cultivated ties with the king of Alba (Scotland) and even with disaffected Viking lords.
She died in 918, just days before the Vikings at York surrendered to her and accepted her as their overlord. Her life’s work led to a combined kingdom of Mercia and Wessex that lay the foundation for a united nation of England.
[Read more about Æthelflæd]

Æthelflæd was an Anglo-Saxon queen and warrior in 9th and 10th century England, who fought to protect her land from Viking invasion.

The eldest child of King Alfred of Wessex (better known as Alfred the Great), Æthelflæd was raised in a time when the kingdoms of England were being conquered by Danish Vikings to create the new territory of the Danelaw. As a teenager she was married to Æthelred, lord of the neighbouring kingdom of Mercia, to form an alliance against the Vikings. On the way to her wedding she personally fought off a Viking attack, which may have been sent to assassinate her and prevent the marriage.

The alliance proved effective in bullying the Vikings into making a temporary peace, and the couple took advantage by building a series of forts to help defend their lands. When in 902 Æthelred began to suffer a wasting illness, Æthelflæd became the ruler of Mercia in all but name.

As ‘Lady of the Mercians’ she undertook a military and political campaign to reclaim what had been lost to the Danelaw. In 905 she led her forces in repelling a Viking attack on the port of Chester, and in 907 she took an army deep into Danish East Anglia to retrieve the bones of a Christian saint.

In 917 she again went to war, not just against Vikings at Derby, but also against Welsh kings who had been opening their borders to Viking forces. This was more of a tactical than bloodthirsty move, leading to alliances with some Welsh rulers. A cunning politician, she also cultivated ties with the king of Alba (Scotland) and even with disaffected Viking lords.

She died in 918, just days before the Vikings at York surrendered to her and accepted her as their overlord. Her life’s work led to a combined kingdom of Mercia and Wessex that lay the foundation for a united nation of England.

[Read more about Æthelflæd]

Catalina de Erauso, also known as the ‘Nun Lieutenant’, was a legendary Basque soldier and duellist in the 17th century. 
Raised in a convent, De Erauso ran away at age 15 shortly before taking her vows as a nun. As Spanish society allowed little freedom for women, she took to disguising herself as a young man. After a few years roaming Spain as a page, she signed up on a ship to Peru as a cabin boy.
She worked in the Peruvian town of Trujillo in a store, but had to leave after injuring a relative of her employer in a duel. She moved to Lima but again had to leave in shame following a scandal involving a young woman. This led to her enlisting in the Spanish army and fighting in Chile during the Arauco War. At one point she was under the command of her own brother, Miguel, who never recognized her.
On the front lines in Chile, De Erauso reached the rank of lieutenant and became famed for her sword-fighting skills, however she fell into disfavour for killing an enemy leader who her superiors wanted captured alive. Disgraced, she fell into the habits of drinking and gambling, which in turn led to her fighting in a number of duels. This led to tragedy when she inadvertently killed her own brother in a duel gone wrong.
Grief-stricken she became an outlaw and con-artist, on one occasion absconding with a dowry paid to her to marry a young woman. She eventually entered into a convent in Lima after confessing her sex to a bishop. On return to Europe in 1624 De Erauso’s story had become public knowledge and she toured Italy as a celebrity. She was so famous that she was reportedly granted special dispensation by Pope Urban VIII to wear men’s clothing.
She returned to New Spain in 1645, using the name Antonio de Erauso, where she worked as a mule driver on the road from Veracruz. She died in Cuetlaxtla in 1650. Her autobiography, Memoir of a Basque Transvestite in the New World, is still widely read today.

Catalina de Erauso, also known as the ‘Nun Lieutenant’, was a legendary Basque soldier and duellist in the 17th century. 

Raised in a convent, De Erauso ran away at age 15 shortly before taking her vows as a nun. As Spanish society allowed little freedom for women, she took to disguising herself as a young man. After a few years roaming Spain as a page, she signed up on a ship to Peru as a cabin boy.

She worked in the Peruvian town of Trujillo in a store, but had to leave after injuring a relative of her employer in a duel. She moved to Lima but again had to leave in shame following a scandal involving a young woman. This led to her enlisting in the Spanish army and fighting in Chile during the Arauco War. At one point she was under the command of her own brother, Miguel, who never recognized her.

On the front lines in Chile, De Erauso reached the rank of lieutenant and became famed for her sword-fighting skills, however she fell into disfavour for killing an enemy leader who her superiors wanted captured alive. Disgraced, she fell into the habits of drinking and gambling, which in turn led to her fighting in a number of duels. This led to tragedy when she inadvertently killed her own brother in a duel gone wrong.

Grief-stricken she became an outlaw and con-artist, on one occasion absconding with a dowry paid to her to marry a young woman. She eventually entered into a convent in Lima after confessing her sex to a bishop. On return to Europe in 1624 De Erauso’s story had become public knowledge and she toured Italy as a celebrity. She was so famous that she was reportedly granted special dispensation by Pope Urban VIII to wear men’s clothing.

She returned to New Spain in 1645, using the name Antonio de Erauso, where she worked as a mule driver on the road from Veracruz. She died in Cuetlaxtla in 1650. Her autobiography, Memoir of a Basque Transvestite in the New World, is still widely read today.

The Rani of Jhansi Regiment was the Women’s Regiment of the Indian National Army (INA) during the Second World War. It was named after Lakshmibai, Rani of Jhansi, a revolutionary heroine.

The regiment was formed in 1942, along with other Indian nationalist forces aiming to overthrow the British Raj in colonial India, with assistance from Imperial Japan. Most of the 1500 women were not from India at all, but teenage volunteers of Indian descent from rubber plantations in Malaya.

The regiment was raised in Singapore and were organised into officers or sepoys (privates) based on their education. It was led by Captain Lakshmi Sahgal, who was upper-class and highly educated. The cadets were trained in the use of rifles, hand grenades and bayonet charges. Some received additional training in field medicine and jungle warfare in preparation for operations in Burma. 

In 1944 the Rani were deployed in Burma alongside other INA forces and the Japanese army. 100 Rani troops are are noted as forming a vanguard unit as part of the ongoing Battle of Imphal, while other Rani gave support to the Nursing Corps there.

By March 1945 the INA had failed at Imphal and were forced into a disastrous retreat. The Rani suffered losses from Allied air attacks during the retreat and were disbanded not long after. While Lakshmi Sahgal went on to become the Minister of Women’s Affairs in the Azad Hind government, the fate of most members of the Rani of Jhansi regiment is unknown.

Mariya Bayda was a Russian scout in the Crimea during World War 2 who was awarded the title of Hero of the Soviet Union.
Having dropped out of school at 14, Bayda worked at a hospital before joining the Red Army in 1941 as a nurse. A member of the 172nd Shooting Division, she was deployed to the front lines of the North Caucasian front.
She went on to become a scout with the rank of senior sergeant. Her Hero title was awarded following a mission in 1942 where she became involved in a gun battle against an number of Wehrmacht submachine gunners. She killed several of the Germans (some reports claim as many as 15) before escaping wounded.
In July 1942 she was again wounded and then captured by German forces. She was taken to the Slavuta concentration camp in Ukraine and was later moved to Ravensbruck. She was released by American forces on May 8, 1945.
Following the war she worked as a civil servant in Sevastopol. In 1976, she was again honoured as a Hero and an Honourable Citizen of Sevastopol. She died in 2002, aged 80.

Mariya Bayda was a Russian scout in the Crimea during World War 2 who was awarded the title of Hero of the Soviet Union.

Having dropped out of school at 14, Bayda worked at a hospital before joining the Red Army in 1941 as a nurse. A member of the 172nd Shooting Division, she was deployed to the front lines of the North Caucasian front.

She went on to become a scout with the rank of senior sergeant. Her Hero title was awarded following a mission in 1942 where she became involved in a gun battle against an number of Wehrmacht submachine gunners. She killed several of the Germans (some reports claim as many as 15) before escaping wounded.

In July 1942 she was again wounded and then captured by German forces. She was taken to the Slavuta concentration camp in Ukraine and was later moved to Ravensbruck. She was released by American forces on May 8, 1945.

Following the war she worked as a civil servant in Sevastopol. In 1976, she was again honoured as a Hero and an Honourable Citizen of Sevastopol. She died in 2002, aged 80.

A British woman officer or non-commissioned officer can and often does give orders to a man private. The men obey smartly and know it is no shame. For British women have proven themselves in this war. They have stuck to their posts near burning ammunition dumps, delivered messages afoot after their motorcycles have been blasted from under them. They have pulled aviators from burning planes. They have died at the gun posts and as they fell another girl has stepped directly into the position and “carried on.” There is not a single record in this war of any British woman in uniformed service quitting her post or failing in her duty under fire.

Now you understand why British soldiers respect the women in uniform. They have won the right to the utmost respect.